Gülen’s teachings discussed this time in New York

Columbia University in New York hosted a symposium titled, “Islam in Turkey Today” to discuss Fethullah Gülen and his ideas.
Columbia University in New York hosted a symposium titled, “Islam in Turkey Today” to discuss Fethullah Gülen and his ideas.


Date posted: November 5, 2007

The academic world around the globe is holding conferences and symposia one after another to discuss the ideas and dialogue activities of Fethullah Gülen, one of the greatest Islamic scholars of our age.

Following a conference titled “Muslim World in Transition: Contributions of the Gülen Movement” held in London in the last week of October, Columbia University in New York hosted a symposium titled “Islam in Turkey Today,” where Gülen and his ideas were discussed once again.

The conference, where Justice and Development Party (AK Party) İstanbul deputy Nursuna Memecan also made a presentation, was attended by over 300 people from various countries.

On the first day of the conference, during the afternoon session titled “The Gülen Movement: An Analysis,” Bekim Agai, Ph.D., from the department of Islamic studies at Bonn University, presented a paper on “The Success Secret of the Movement: Understanding the Emergence of the Global Education Movement.” Agai spoke about the Islamic understanding of Fethullah Gülen from a wide perspective. Stating that the Turco-Islamic understanding pioneered by Gülen was a great opportunity for the world, Agai noted, “Mr. Gülen proved that unconditional tolerance could be shown not only amongst Muslims, but also toward the members of other faiths.”

Professor Paul Parker, chairperson of the department of theology and religion at Elmhurst College, dwelled on the direct positive impact of the Turkish schools around the world on global peace. “Education cannot guarantee a 100 percent peace; however, if schools like Gülen’s aren’t founded, peace can never be established. That is, trying to establish peace without giving education would only be a dream,” Parker said.

The sessions on Friday focused broadly on the role of Islam in the Ottoman Empire, along with Islamic movements that sprung up in the aftermath of its collapse, from the more traditionally based to the well-known Gülen movement, while Saturday’s sessions spotlighted the current relationship between Islam and politics, examining both the 2007 elections and the interplay between culture and religion in Turkish politics.

Source: Today's Zaman , November 5, 2007


Related News

Once They were Brothers – Bir Zamanlar Kardeştiler

Kanter himself has faced legitimate threats from Erdoğan’s government. In 2017, Kanter escaped Turkish agents in Indonesia while working at a basketball camp for his foundation. He was detained in Romania for several hours and Turkish authorities had already cancelled his passport, making him a stateless man. Eventually, he was able to return to the United States, but not without a Turkish arrest warrant and a four-year prison sentence.

Water Well Constructed in Uganda in Memory of Slain Journalist

The charity Kimse Yok Mu (Is Anybody There?) and the Embrace Relief aid foundation, founded by Turks residing in the US, have jointly constructed a water well in Uganda dedicated to the memory of James Foley, an American journalist killed by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant (ISIL).

Scholars to Address Nigerian Conference

The conference will be particularly interesting because many volunteers, inspired by Fethullah Gülen’s ideas, have established 17 schools in Nigeria during the past 13 years.

What is behind the schools associated with Gülen?

TAHA AKYOL, May/07/2012 What is behind the schools associated with the Fethullah Gülen movement (aka Hizmet movement)? Since the first school abroad was opened in Azerbaijan in 1991, what is the power that has caused them to be so widespread across the world in 30 (including domestic schools) years? Can the “green belt” theory of […]

Hizmet really has expanded my understanding of what it means to be human.

Kenneth Hunter is the Principal of the Prosser Career Academy High School. He studied theology at Chicago Loyola University and taught world religions in high schools. He served as the chairperson of Illinois State Board of Education Language Arts Assessment Advisory Council (2002-2012). He is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Chicago.

A time for sacrifice

The sacrificial festival has many social aspects to it: it is all about charity, community and family, as well as the pilgrimage. During this holiday, people visit their relatives and friends; family ties are strengthened, and it gives children an opportunity to bond with the older generation. The sacrificial festival is a time for wishing one another well, exchanging gifts, having big feasts, donating and praying.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

“There will be no Turkish Olympiad,” says Erdoğan

Kyrgyz-Turkish schools alumni builds a girls’ dormitory

Prominent businessman Akın İpek pledges huge support to Kimse Yok Mu

Turkish Cultural Center Brooklyn Honors Borough’s Elected Officials

Lawyers to Trump: Don’t pressure judges in Turkey extradition case

Fortunately, we have not closed Gülen schools

Action plan put into operation against Hizmet, indictment reveals

Copyright 2023 Hizmet News