Azerbaijan detains Turkish teacher under UN protection as wife fears deportation


Date posted: June 10, 2017

Taci Şentürk, a Turkish teacher who was working in the Azerbaijani capital of Baku, was taken by police to an unknown place after UN officials stopped his deportation to Turkey at Baku Heydar Aliyev International Airport on June 7, his wife said.

In a video shared on social media, Fatma Şentürk said her husband was detained at his office by Azerbaijan police at noon on Wednesday and taken to the airport for deportation to Turkey at the Turkish government’s request since he was working for institutions linked to the faith-based Gülen movement, which Ankara accuses of masterminding a failed coup last summer.

UN officials stopped his deportation minutes before he was to be put on a plane by Azerbaijan police at the Baku airport after his family applied for UN protection for Şentürk, his wife said.

However, Azerbaijani police took Şentürk to an unknown place and his family has not been informed of his whereabouts.

“I have not heard anything from my husband for the last two days. I worry for his life,” Fatma Şentürk said.

Calling on international human rights organizations, including the European Court of Human Rights and the UN, Fatma Şentürk said “Please help us to save my husband’s life.”

This is not the first time a foreign country has detained or deported people over their links to the Gülen movement as part of the Turkish government’s witch-hunt against movement followers.

In May Saudi Arabia, Malaysia, Georgia and Myanmar handed over academics, businessmen and school principals upon the Turkish government’s request despite the fact that some of those victims already had refugee status with the UN.

Turkey survived a military coup attempt on July 15 that killed over 240 people and wounded more than a thousand others. After the putsch, the government along with President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan accused the Gülen movement of masterminding the attempt.

The movement and Fethullah Gülen, a US-based Islamic scholar whose views inspired the movement, strongly denies any involvement.

President Erdoğan earlier called on foreign governments to punish Gülen followers in their own countries.

Source: Turkish Minute , June 10, 2017


Related News

Hizmet turns theories of Millennium Development Goals into practice

The 2015 Millennium Development Goals of the UN were discussed in the international panel, with participants agreeing that the goals can only be sustainably achieved through education.

Turkish Airlines stops distribution of Zaman and Today’s Zaman on its planes

Turkey’s flagship carrier Turkish Airlines (THY) has put an embargo on dailies affiliated with the Fethullah Gülen Movement, which has been in at odds with the government over an ongoing corruption investigation. The airline, 74 percent of which is owned by the state, had already stopped delivering the English-language daily Today’s Zaman in airport terminals and on planes before slashing the distribution of its Turkish sibling, daily Zaman, by two-thirds.

Police and inspectors raid Gülen-inspired kindergarten in Manisa

Police and inspectors from several government departments have carried out further raids on Gülen-inspired schools, including a kindergarten in Manisa, as part of a government-led operation targeting the faith-based Gülen movement, popularly known as the Hizmet movement, influenced by the teachings of Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen.

Thailand’s Lanna princess hails Turkish schools

The traditional iftar dinner by the Turkish schools in Thailand brought together people from diverse segments of the community. The princess of Lanna Chao Duangduan was among the prominent guests of the dinner. Duangduan made noteworthy points in her remarks.

PM continues war he already lost

If a statement appearing in the Cumhuriyet daily, where the prime minister was quoted as saying that the “money used [in corruption] belongs to the state, not the people” reflects the truth, then this is a clear acknowledgement of wrongdoing.

Turkey’s post-coup purges shake higher education

With the summer holiday almost over, computer science student Hande Tekiner should be gearing up for a year of cram sessions and late-night homework. Instead, she may have nowhere to return to, as her university was shut after Turkey’s failed coup.

Latest News

ECtHR rules Bulgaria violated rights of Turkish journalist who was deported despite seeking asylum

Fethullah Gülen’s Message of Condolences in the Wake of the Western European Floods

Pregnant woman kept in prison for 4 months over Gülen links despite regulations

Normalization of Abduction, Torture, and Death in Erdogan’s Turkey

Turkey’s Maarif Foundation illegally seized German-run school in Ethiopia, says manager

Failed 2016 coup was gov’t plot to purge Gülenists from state bodies, journalist claims

Grondahl: Turkish community strong in wake of threats from back home

Turkish-Kyrgyz educator’s abduction shows Ankara’s ruthless disregard for law: HRW

Kenya: Investigate Deportation of Turkish National

In Case You Missed It

Brussels, Paris and Berlin

The Einstein of the Islamic world

Turkish court jails 17 housewives over alleged coup involvement

Watkins’ Mind Body Spirit Magazine included Fethullah Gulen among its 100 Most Spiritually Influential Living People

HRW: 6 Turks taken from Kosovo to Turkey face risk of torture and abuse

Bangladesh’s Turkish school student becomes first in world math exam

Trustees decide to remove Gülen’s books from NT bookstores

Copyright 2021 Hizmet News