Turkey coup: Conspiracy theorists claim power grab attempt was faked by Erdogan

Civilians carry the Turkish flag onto a tank abandoned by rebel soldiers Reuters
Civilians carry the Turkish flag onto a tank abandoned by rebel soldiers Reuters


Date posted: July 18, 2016

Adam Lusher

Conspiracy theorists are saying the attempted military coup in Turkey was faked, after President Recep Tayyip Erdogan reportedly called it “a gift from Allah”.

Social media users have compared the coup attempt in which more than 160 people are thought to have died to the Reichstag fire – the 1933 arson attack on the German parliament building which Hitler used as an excuse to suspend civil liberties and order mass arrests of his opponents.

President Erdogan reportedly told supporters at Istanbul’s international airport that the coup attempt was the work of the movement led by the exiled preacher Fethullah Gulen, which he denounced as “an armed terrorist organisation”.

He was quoted as calling the attempted coup “a gift from God,” reportedly saying it would help cleanse the military of “members of the gang” who would “pay a heavy price for their treason”.

This immediately led many to fear that President Erdogan, who has previously been accused of persecuting critics, will use the coup as an excuse to further crack down on his opponents. Such fears are likely to be stoked by Turkish TV reports that 2,745 judges have been removed from their offices following the coup attempt.

Some observers have even begun specualting that the coup was stage-managed to give Mr Erdogan an opportunity to purge the military of opponents and increase his grip on Turkey.

Ryan Heath, the senior EU correspondent at Politico, used Twitter to share comments from his “Turkish source”, who called the events of Friday night a “fake coup” which would help a “fake democracy warrior” [Erdogan].

The source said: “Probably we’ll see an early election [in] which he’ll try to guarantee an unbelievable majority of the votes. And this will probably guarantee another 10-15 years of authoritarian, elected dictatorship.

“We’ll possibly see a change in the constitution for worse, which secularism will be gone and Islamist motifs will be in!”

Using the hashtag #TheatreNotCoup, a Twitter user calling himself Subsidiarity Man wrote: “Two words: Reichstag fire. The year was 1933 and you know what happened next.”

Another Twitter user quoted “my special friend in Istanbul” as calling what happened: “Most probably a real coup attempt, which was vaguely known beforehand, and was allowed to proceed, because they knew it to be disorganised and weak.

“This means it will be followed by a real coup by Erdogan himself, and the last remnants of democracy will be lost.”

In a reference to the history of Nazi Germany, the friend added: “A civilian brown-shirt movement is already in the making, and this will rule the streets once the so-called coup is defeated in a couple of days.”

The Gulen movement, also known as Hizmet and led by the US-based moderate Islamic cleric Fethullah Gulen, has rejected Mr Erdogan’s accusations and denied any involvement in the coup.

The group, which presses for a moderate version of Sunni Islam that emphasises interfaith dialogue, has regularly accused President Erdogan of harassing and unfairly arresting its supporters.

Before the attempted coup, there had also been extensive international criticism of Mr Erdogan’s human rights record, especially his growing repression of the media.

It has been reported that since 2014 1,845 journalists, writers and critics have faced charges of insulting the president, an offence which in Turkey carries a potential jail sentence.

President Erdogan faced particular scrutiny earlier this year after he demanded a criminal prosecution of the German satirist Jan Böhmermann who used profane language to insult him on television.

This prompted the British right-wing magazine The Spectator to run a President Erdogan Offensive Poetry competition – won by the then former London mayor, now Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson, with a limerick suggesting the Turkish president had enjoyed sexual congress with a goat.

It read:

There was a young fellow from Ankara

Who was a terrific wankerer

Till he sowed his wild oats

With the help of a goat

But he didn’t even stop to thankera.

As news of the coup attempt emerged, Mr Johnson issued a series of messages in support of President Erdogan and his “democratic elected government and institutions”.

Source: Independent , July 16, 2016


Related News

Istanbul police display hundreds of books among evidence of ‘terror’

Police seized Gülen’s 1,500 books; 24 CDs featuring Gülen’s speeches; TL 435,200 ($148,000) along with $99,200 and 700 euros; several laptops; two guns and some digital data, during operations targeting the alleged terrorist network of the movement.

Once They were Brothers – Bir Zamanlar Kardeştiler

Kanter himself has faced legitimate threats from Erdoğan’s government. In 2017, Kanter escaped Turkish agents in Indonesia while working at a basketball camp for his foundation. He was detained in Romania for several hours and Turkish authorities had already cancelled his passport, making him a stateless man. Eventually, he was able to return to the United States, but not without a Turkish arrest warrant and a four-year prison sentence.

Exiled Turkish professor ‘leading US university’

Medical scholar branded a ‘terrorist’ by Turkey over his alleged links to a US-based cleric is named head of an institution in Texas. Professor Tekalan is a former rector of Istanbul’s Fatih University.

‘Pool media’ court case against Zaman daily tossed out

An İstanbul court tossed out a court case filed against the Zaman daily by the Turkuvaz Media Group involving a Zaman news article detailing pro-government businessman pooling funds together to purchase Turkuvaz late last week.

2014: Towards an “Empire of Fear”

The judiciary package paved the way for the detention of all dissidents and the appropriation of their assets. Turkey became an “Empire of Fear” with the arrangements concerning MİT, internal security, reasonable suspicion and the criminal courts of peace.

Row between Turkish government and Gulen Movement takes new twist

The row between Turkey’s ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) and Fethullah Gulen’s Hizmet Movement, one of the most influential religious communities in the country, has taken an interesting twist after the revelation of a 2004 document. In 2004, the National Security Council proposed a clampdown on the Gulen movement (aka Hizmet), which suggested that harsh sanctions should be enforced on them.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

What is the main offense that the Cemaat (Hizmet movement) has committed?

We must have more empathy for people fleeing for their lives around the world

Malaysia: Turkish wives say husbands not terrorists, want them released

Future’s continent and African renaissance

Halki, pope, patriarch and Gülen

History will record this [AK Party’s attack on Hizmet] as well

Standing by the Education Rights of Schoolgirls

Copyright 2022 Hizmet News