MEP: International investigation into Turkey’s rule of law needed


Date posted: January 21, 2014

 İSTANBUL

Ahead of Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s visit to Brussels, Dutch member of the European Parliament Marietje Schaake, from the Democrats 66 party, has called for an independent international investigation into the rule of law in Turkey in light of the crisis in the country.

In a press statement released on Tuesday, Schaake stated: “The separation of powers is under immense pressure in Turkey and the rule of law is not upheld. This crisis also impacts the relations between the European Union and Turkey, because measures taken, such as political intervention with the judicial branch, are not in line with European rules. The independence of the judiciary has been a concern for Europe for much longer. I hope the current crisis in Turkey will be soon be resolved and that we can concentrate on the accession negotiations.”

The statement added that over the past month, politicians from the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) have been accused of corruption and retaliated by accusing the judiciary of being infiltrated by supporters of the Hizmet movement with a hidden agenda.

Hundreds of police officers and public prosecutors have now been fired or removed from their files and Prime Minister Erdoğan has also accused the international community and financial markets of plotting against Turkey, Schaake said.

While Schaake remains convinced of the potential benefits of Turkish accession for both the EU and Turkey, the time has come to take a clear European stance against this unprecedented turmoil in Turkey, the statement added.

“My party has always emphasized the importance of a functioning rule of law, the separation of powers and respect for human rights in Turkey. The accession process can contribute to these principles, but the problems are now so immense that they need to be investigated independently. Because of the mistrust and polarization, an investigation led by an international committee of experts would have the greatest effect. The European Commission should propose this to Erdoğan and international partners,” said Schaake.

In response to the crisis, the Turkish government has once again cracked down on digital

freedoms, Schaake stressed, adding that “This is not the first time that freedom of speech, freedom of the press and digital freedom are being repressed in Turkey. These measures prove that the country is not full-fledged democracy yet.”

On Schaake’s initiative, digital freedoms are now an integral part of the accession criteria of the EU (Copenhagen Criteria). The European Parliament has called for the opening of the negotiation chapters on the rule of law and fundamental rights, but the member states have not unanimously supported take this step, the statement also added.

Source: Todays Zaman , January 21, 2014


Related News

Families Of Afghan-Turk School Students Hold Protest In Kabul [against Turkish Gov’t]

Families of Afghan-Turk Schools students on Sunday held a protest meeting in Kabul and called on the Afghan government to rescind its decision to hand over the Afghan-Turk schools to the Turkish government.

Kurdish problem, PKK, AKP, Hizmet movement

Ihsan YILMAZ  July 4, 2012 The Kurdish problem in Turkey has many domestic and international dimensions. It is, of course, impossible to touch upon all of these in a column. Thus, I will look at only a few of these aspects. It is obvious that the Justice and Development Party (AKP) wants to solve the […]

Turkey harshly criticized by panel in US over press freedom

The government’s recent crackdown on the media was severely criticized during a panel discussion at the National Press Club (NPC) in Washington, D.C.

PM Sipilä and FM Soini of Finland: Turkey needs to return to a path that respects human rights

Prime Minister Juha Sipilä and Foreign Minister Timo Soini [of Finland] have responded to a letter from the Finnish Union of Journalists. The Union’s missive asked the ministers to urge Turkey to avoid extreme measures in the aftermath of July’s failed coup.

Turkey purge victims unable to find jobs, leave country

“It’s a kind of civil death,” Kerem Altiparmak, a human rights lawyer and political science professor at Ankara University told Los Angeles Times on Wednesday when describing how the lives of thousands of people change after the July 15 coup attempt.

Kyrgyz president: Those calling Turkish teachers terrorists should see a doctor

Kyrgyz President Almazbek Atambayev has said those who view as terrorists teachers working at the Gülen-linked SAPAT educational institutions in the country need treatment and should see a doctor.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

Turkish schools are selected best high schools in Mongolia

Turkey warns Kazakhstan over Gulen-linked schools

Media freedom in Turkey takes another blow

Chief Minister inaugurates housing units for flood affectees

Peace Islands Honors Noteworthy NJ Residents

THY’s Topçu defends embargo on papers, defamation campaign

Çağlayan: TUSKON Trade Bridge soon to be global brand

Copyright 2022 Hizmet News