PBS airs story on Gülen movement


Date posted: January 24, 2011

Public Broadcasting Service (PBS) program Religion and Ethics NewsWeekly featured a story on the Gülen movement on Friday, quoting well-respected American observers, as well as the movement’s members and admirers.

The 10-minute-long story by PBS correspondent Luck Severson gave information on the movement, which is a group of volunteers engaged in interfaith and intercultural dialogue inspired by the ideas of Fethullah Gülen, a Turkish Islamic scholar well known for his teachings promoting mutual understanding and tolerance between cultures.

Watch the news:

 

 

Source: PBS


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