Amnesty laments treatment of Turkey purge victims

Amnesty said many were fired with no explanations given, therefore making it hard to challenge the dismissals.
Amnesty said many were fired with no explanations given, therefore making it hard to challenge the dismissals.


Date posted: November 1, 2018

Almost 130,000 public sector workers fired by decree during post-coup state of emergency due to alleged links to plotters.

ANKARA – Amnesty International on Thursday criticised what it called the “shameful” treatment of Turkish civil servants who were dismissed after the 2016 failed overthrow of President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Almost 130,000 public sector workers were fired by decree during a post-coup state of emergency because of their alleged links to the plotters, terrorist organisations or other groups posing a threat to national security.

Those who believe they were wrongfully sacked can apply to a special commission to have their case reviewed and either be reinstated or compensated.

However, Amnesty said many were fired with no explanations given, therefore making it hard to challenge the dismissals.

A majority are still “awaiting justice” and face “an uncertain future”, Amnesty said, adding that so far only 6,000 had returned to their jobs.

The dismissals included more than 33,500 teachers and 31,500 police officers.

The commission has “failed to uphold international standards and is acting as a de facto rubber stamp for the initial flawed decisions,” Andrew Gardner, Amnesty’s Turkey strategy and research manager, said.

The “whole process is a shameful affront to justice”, he added in a statement.

The rights group said the lack of an effective appeals process was “one of the worst human rights violations of the state of emergency period”.

Amnesty also criticised the “innocuous” reasons given for dismissals. It said that the reasons given by the commission for upholding sackings often “lack merit and foregrounding in law”.

The commission has only issued rulings in a third of cases so far, of which less than seven percent were “positive decisions”.

Turkey accuses the US-based Muslim preacher Fethullah Gulen and his movement of ordering the attempted putsch, claims which he strongly denies.

His movement is described by Ankara as the “Fethullah Terrorist Organisation” (FETO).

Turkish authorities say the purges are necessary to cleanse the “virus” of the Gulen movement’s infiltration of state institutions.

Although the state of emergency ended in July, Amnesty says a recently approved law still allows “summary dismissals” of public sector workers.

Source: Middle East Online , October 25, 2018


Related News

Turkey’s Erdogan exploiting failed coup to crush dissent, tighten grip on power

After a searing summer that has already featured a failed military coup, spectacular terrorist attacks and now a new war across the border in Syria, Turkey’s cultural elite is watching with increased unease as authoritarian President Recep Tayyip Erdogan rides a wave of nationalism that they fear will be used to brand his critics as enemies of the state.

The Erdoğan-Gülen encounter and democracy

It is not normal that the non-political Gülen movement would occupy such a central space in election campaigning; this is why the situation calls for some special scrutiny.

Filling the gap left by Gulen

Erdogan and Gulen shared the goal of creating a “devout generation”. Yet despite their similar outlook on life and objectives, the Gulen movement never merged completely with the AKP. However, Gulen was never willing to subordinate himself to Erdogan, which is why the two men fell out in 2013 and the informal coalition with the Gulen movement collapsed.

Turkish man in Netherlands sentenced for threatening Erdogan critic

O.E., a 19-year-old supporter of the Justice and Development Party (AKP), who threatened to kill M.D. (32), a sympathizer of the Gülen movement who live in the Netherlands’ Tilburg city was sentenced by a Dutch court.

Municipality illegally demolishes building in İstanbul

Workers from the İstanbul Metropolitan Municipality have demolished a small, prefabricated shelter on land that belongs to the Hizmet-affiliated Mehtap Education Foundation, despite the lack of official permission to carry out the demolition.

Lawyer Karahan: Hate crimes against Hizmet can be prosecuted at ECtHR, ICC

The Savings Deposit Insurance Fund (TMSF) has taken over management control of some of the privileged shares of Bank Asya as part of a government-operated crackdown on institutions affiliated with the Gülen movement, also known as Hizmet, and shareholders will be filing a lawsuit against the action, but this week’s guest for Monday Talk has said it is likely that the case will end up at the European Court of Human Rights and even at the International Criminal Court.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

Turkey Deports Journalist for Criticizing Government on Twitter

New Constitution expected to eradicate remnants of Feb. 28 coup

Why does Turkey’s President Erdogan want Knicks’ Enes Kanter in jail?

Kimse Yok Mu offers much-needed help in Gaza

Former Norwegian PM: Our center takes same approach as Gülen

Members of US Congress withstand intense pressure over press freedom letter

What’s Friendship Got to Do With [Mr. Gulen’s] Extradition?

Copyright 2023 Hizmet News