Turkish schools and the race in philanthropy!

Erhan Başyurt
Erhan Başyurt


Date posted: January 29, 2015

The government is in a strange effort to close down Turkish schools abroad.

Some time ago they announced a determination to block any activity and got in the way of the Turkish Olympiad.

Why would anyone be bothered by a touching, sweet competition, where students from all around the world come and see our country, sing Turkish songs and recite Turkish poetry?

And now they try to destroy the greatest “cultural lobby” in Turkish history – a lobby that flies the Turkish flag and teaches Turkish.

They try to shut down Turkish schools –the outcome of efforts of a quarter century– that act as commercial bridges for Turkish businesspeople.

President Erdoğan announced at his visit to Ethiopia:

“Both I, the prime minister and other ministers explain the situation about those schools to our counterparts in the countries we visit; we ask them to close them down and tell we can provide the same services through the Turkish Ministry of Education…”

Then, Prime Minister Davutoğlu announced in Davos that the Education Ministry has been working on something.

“There is a strategic decision we have made: to unite all educational activities. I believe it will be ready and proposed to the Cabinet next week…”

Government spokesman and Deputy Prime Minister Bülent Arınç said the effort was discussed at the last Cabinet meeting and a presentation was made.ınç reminded the limits set by law and said, “We don’t have a duty to close down the Turkish schools there, and we lack the power, too.”

“If those schools are run like commercial firms are we may suggest their takeover, acquisition or association with some other partner. We are not a state that rules over the world on its own; we are not in a position to instruct the 160 countries spread around the globe to close these schools down…”

Arınç’s words reveal how futile an attempt it would be to make education identical across the world, even more so when schools in Turkey are not regulated that way.

It is hard to understand officials who, while holding foreign schools in Turkey in high esteem and starting private educational institutions themselves, think of “instructing” the world to the contrary.

So here is the real question that needs to be answered:

Why would Turkish politicians be bothered by tens of thousands of youngsters in more than 160 countries –including Kenya, Afghanistan, Yemen, Turkmenistan, Romania, Burma, Indonesia and Brazil– learning Turkish, or by the fact that these young people receive private education under the supervision of the Turkish Ministry of Education?

These students –varying in color, language and religion– are neither Turkish citizens, nor do they vote in elections in Turkey.

The mentality that, despite acquired rights, decides to shut down prep schools on grounds they are private enterprises can be expected to close down any other private school across the country.

Yet, it is hard to believe that they give “instructions” to more than 160 countries and force them to act against law.

As a government, Turkey has the potential to spread similar educational services across the world.

The Yunus Emre Institutes, Turkish Cooperation and Development Agency (TİKA) and Turkish Ministry of Education may engage in new efforts, starting a “race in philanthropy”!

Yet, they prefer to undermine Turkey’s thriving international brands in order to change the domestic agenda; and to use these arguments as policy tools is not in the interest of the country.

We should be flying new flags in each country while we can; there is no logical explanation in trying to take down the ones that were flown before the present politicians were on stage.

The late ex-President Özal, Mister Demirel, late ex-Prime Minister Ecevit and hundreds of other Turkish statesmen put their signature under these schools; foresightedly, they stood behind them – who would be bothered by such an achievement and why?

Why would they be disturbed by the spread of the Turkish language, the fact that Turkey is becoming a focus of affection, and the establishment of cultural and commercial links with more than 160 countries?

Tens of thousands of candidates compete to get into these schools, which are dearly upheld by host countries and are named for their international achievements. So instead of looking for ways to close them down, Turkey should try to reward and encourage them.

We should try to improve what is already a remarkable success; it is not the time to undermine the globally envied and admired works that are the combined product of the Anatolian people’s benevolence, entrepreneurs’ efforts and teachers’ altruism.

Source: BGN News , January 29, 2015


Related News

A destructive option for Turkey takes shape

It is a “parallel state,” Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan claims, and the movement gets help from its die-hard loyal media, as well as some leftist-secular circles and even from abroad. Such diversion on this issue helps him buy time, water down the content of accusations and divert attention.

Private schools leave mark on Science Olympiad

İzmir’s private Yamanlar, Ankara’s private Samanyolu and İstanbul’s Fatih colleges all left their mark on the 20th National Antalya Mathematics Science Olympiad, organized for primary and secondary schools by Akdeniz University and held on May 3 and 4.

Supreme court calls on AK Party’s Şahin to substantiate claim about Gülen

The Supreme Court of Appeals has asked a senior Justice and Development Party (AK Party) official to hand over any evidence regarding his allegations about US-based Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen amid claims by the official that a judge at the high court had acted contrary to legal procedures and contacted Gülen before issuing his final verdict in a case against a businessman several years ago.

Turkish PM admits did not know identity of putschists when he blamed Gülen movement

A year after a failed coup on July 15, 2016, Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım said he did not know who had attempted to carry out the coup when they blamed the Gülen movement, in an interview published in Hürriyet.

Political thunder from Turkey rumbles all the way to New Orleans

And how appalling that they should now be exposed to the atrocious anti-Muslim diatribes of a U.S. presidential candidate not all that different from Erdogan in his threats and his bigotry.

US lawmaker says Gülen should not be extradited, calls his movement strongest element against radical Islamists

United States (US) Rep. Dana Rohrabacher, released a statement on Monday, saying that the US should turn down the Turkish president’s demand of the extradition of Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen as he could not be part of a coup attempt, calling his movement “strongest element in his society opposing radical Islamist terrorism.”

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

The state, AKP, Religious Affairs Directorate, Alevis and rights

GYV hosts guests from Istanbul’s Armenian Patriarchate at Abraham’s table

UN slams Thailand, Myanmar over deportation of Turk

Wife of veteran who lost hand, eyes in bomb attack under custody over Gülen links

2017 model bigotry: Defamation of Jews and Gulen movement in Turkey

“Like a Storm”: Deportations Stun Turks in Kosovo

Lawyers to Trump: Don’t pressure judges in Turkey extradition case

Copyright 2023 Hizmet News