No country is safe for Gülen sympathizers, Erdoğan says


Date posted: September 20, 2016

President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan on Monday threatened followers of the faith-based Gülen movement living all over the world, saying that no country is safe for them.

“No country, no region anywhere in the world, is a safe haven for FETÖ [an acronym the government has been using to refer to the Gülen movement] and militants,” said Erdoğan during a press conference at İstanbul Atatürk Airport, before flying to New York for the UN General Assembly.

Erdoğan said he would use his speech to the UN General Assembly as an opportunity to talk about the role of the Gülen movement in the July 15 failed coup attempt in Turkey.

“We will continue to warn our friends. We will continue to enter the lairs of this organization.”

Last month, pro-government media outlets threatened critical journalists who worked for media sympathetic to Gülen movement and are now in exile.

Turkey’s National Intelligence Organization (MİT) has been tasked with locating, arresting and even killing military officers who fled Turkey after allegedly taking part in a failed coup attempt last month, according a story in the Vatan daily on Aug. 30.

The Justice and Development Party (AKP) government, which launched a war against the Gülen movement following the eruption of a corruption scandal in late 2013 in which senior government members were implicated, carried its ongoing crackdown on the movement and its sympathizers to a new level after a failed coup attempt on July 15 that killed 240 people and injured a thousand others.

Although the movement strongly denies having any role in the corruption probe or coup attempt, the government accuses it of having masterminded both despite the lack of any tangible evidence.

Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen, whose views inspire the movement and who lives in self-imposed exile in the US, called for an international investigation into the coup attempt, but Erdoğan — calling the putsch “a gift from God” — and the government launched a widespread purge aimed at cleansing sympathizers of the movement from within state institutions, dehumanizing its popular figures and putting them in custody.

The government also accuses the movement of being a terrorist organization.

A report published by the German Focus magazine in July claimed that Turkish government members decided to pin the blame for the coup attempt on Gülen half an hour after the uprising and agreed to begin a purge of Gülen followers the next day.

The German magazine wrote its report based on interceptions of phone calls by English intelligence, emails and SMS messages of members of the Turkish government.

The Turkish government has already purged over 100,00 people, detained 43,000 and arrested 24,000 over alleged ties to the movement. Among the arrestees are journalists, judges, prosecutors, academics, doctors, teachers, nurses and even a comedian.

The official opening of the UN General Assembly will take place on Sept. 20 under the theme “The Sustainable Development Goals: A Universal Push to Transform our World.” Erdoğan will attend the meeting on the occasion of the first anniversary of the approval of the goals and the Development Agenda for 2030.

He will later attend the opening of the General Assembly and will then address world leaders from the UN podium on Sept. 20. Erdoğan is expected to urge world leaders on the need to adopt a common stand against terrorism. Ongoing turmoil in Syria and Turkey’s recent offensive into northern Syria to defeat the Islamic State in Iraq and the Levant (ISIL) will also be on his agenda.

Source: Turkish Minute , September 19, 2016


Related News

U.S. schools are indirectly linked to preacher, often well-regarded

Even before the revolt, this network was already in Erdogan’s sights. Critics say Gulen gets payments from supporters doing contract work on the schools or from “donations” made by Turkish instructors brought to the U.S. on special visas to teach at them, charges he has rejected. Several charter chains thought to be related to the Gulen movement have been investigated by local authorities for misusing taxpayer dollars, but the inquiries haven’t resulted in charges of wrong doing.

Hizmet and countering violent extremism

The Hizmet movement is in trouble in Turkey because of the increasingly despotic Justice and Development Party (AKP) regime’s persecution of its volunteers. But, ironically, this may be good for world peace.

Why Erdoğan exploits anti-American sentiments

With dangerous and discriminatory language, PM Erdoğan exploits anti-American and anti-Israeli sentiment in Turkish society to demonize his opponents. Can Erdoğan win this game? If Erdoğan were confident enough about the corruption case, maybe he could. Instead of letting justice run its proper course, he used his political power to intervene in the judiciary and police forces. This must be considered the most important indicator of his fall.

Fethullah Gulen: Turkey’s Eroding Democracy (op-ed in NY Times)

It is deeply disappointing to see what has become of Turkey in the last few years. Not long ago, it was the envy of Muslim-majority countries: a viable candidate for the European Union on its path to becoming a functioning democracy that upholds universal human rights, gender equality, the rule of law and the rights of Kurdish and non-Muslim citizens.

‘Hiç Durmadan Hizmete Devam’: Turks Decry Erdogan Decision Via #HiçDurmadanHizmeteDevam

Connor Adams Sheets The Turkish phrase “Hiç Durmadan Hizmete Devam” went viral on Twitter Thursday afternoon via the #HiçDurmadanHizmeteDevam hashtag, as Turks around the globe decried Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan’s refusal to reconsider his decision to close the country’s private “prep” schools. “Hiç Durmadan Hizmete Devam,” loosely translated as “do your service without stopping,” is a […]

‘If you are against us, you are the other’

Turkey has been witnessing a rigorous debate for the last couple of weeks over the ruling Justice and Development Party’s (AKP) vow to finish off the test prep schools, which are a source of both money and influence for its old ally, the Hizmet Movement led by the self-exiled leader, Fethullah Gülen. Like many controversies in Turkey, the issue of closing the courses and integrating them into Turkey’s poorly-established and -organized education system was not only about the prep schools, which was only the tip of the iceberg.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

Liberal Turkish Journalists Champion Freedom of Expression, to a Degree

New Zealand politicians attend iftar dinner of Turkish foundation despite embassy’s warning

The Turkish invasion of Nigeria

Turkish deputy PM says Fethullah Gülen is supra-political, conscience of 75 million people in Turkey

Extradition request for Gülen aims at manipulating public perception

Gov’t inspects Gülen-inspired schools while ignoring run-down state schools

Closer look at empire of cleric accused in Turkey coup attempt

Copyright 2022 Hizmet News