Deputy says AK Party tainted by corruption as he resigns


Date posted: January 31, 2014

İSTANBUL

Another deputy from the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party), Muhammed Çetin, slammed the party for being tainted by corruption as he resigned in protest of the government’s response to a graft scandal that has implicated the sons of three ministers and businessmen close to the government as well as the chief of a state bank.

Announcing his resignation at a press conference in Parliament, Çetin said the AK Party has been tainted and turned into the “architect of a process in which the corruption is being covered up, thieves have been protected and unlawfulness has become the rule.”

Çetin criticized the emergence of a narrow clique within the party that has replaced the people who have worked diligently and honestly for the party since its establishment. “The AK Party has swiftly drifted away from its original identity and entered into the hegemony of a narrow oligarchic structure as a minister who resigned stated,” said Çetin, adding that the people are once again disappointed by a political party.

“Consequently, staying in a party that has lost its raison d’être, would be sharing its sins, which is why I am resigning from this party,” stated Çetin. According to him, sycophants and those motivated by self-interest have replaced the honest Anatolian people within the party.

According to Çetin, many of his friends from the party will follow the same path and resign. In response to a question as to why he waited until now to resign, Çetin said that he obeyed the party decision to remain silent. However, “it is not possible to keep silent anymore in the face of injustice, lawlessness, corruption, bribery and the shelving of the Constitution” he said.

Çetin was referred to the party’s disciplinary committee on Jan. 16 for expulsion after he made a joke about shoeboxes in an allusion to the Halkbank manager stashing $4.5 million in shoeboxes.

He reportedly asked AK Party deputies Volkan Bozkır and Ali Aşlık about their shoebox numbers. His joke prompted other deputies to tell to the party administration, who were outraged by the joke and referred Çetin to the disciplinary committee with request of expulsion.

Resignation not linked to Fethullah Gülen

In response to a claim that he resigned on the direction of Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen, Çetin said that although he talked to Gülen, he did not discuss his resignation or any other political subject with him. “He [Gülen] would not disrespect anyone’s political preference.” He added that Gülen was the reason why he had stayed in the party until now. “When you talked to him, you would consult with him and he would express his own opinions without any dictation,” he said.

The incident comes against a backdrop of increasing draconian measures by the ruling AK Party to stifle any opposition and critical voice within the party amid mounting intra-party dissent.

The AK Party has been shaken by resignations following a corruption probe that has rocked Turkey since it became public last month.

In December, following the resignation of three ministers and the replacement of one other in the wake of the corruption probe, former Minister of Interior İdris Naim Şahin also resigned stating that the party has been under the control of a “narrow oligarchic group.”

On the last day of 2013, the party’s Burdur deputy, Hasan Hami Yıldırım, resigned in protest of the government’s response to the graft scandal. With Yıldırım’s resignation, the number of AK Party seats in Parliament dropped to 320 and the number of independent lawmakers rose to 12.

Yıldırım slammed what he called a campaign of insults and defamation against Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen and the Hizmet movement, criticizing the government’s description of Hizmet as a “gang.”

Three deputies — Erdal Kalkan, Ertuğrul Günay and Haluk Özdalga — also left the party before Yıldırım’s resignation, continuing a string of resignations that started in November, bringing the total number of deputies who have resigned to seven.

With the resignation of Çetin, the AK Party’s seats in Parliament have dropped to 319 while the number of independent deputies have risen to 13. Currently, the CHP has 134, the MHP has 52, BDP has 26 and HDP has 4 deputies in the parliament.

Source: Todays Zaman , January 31, 2014


Related News

Votes of religious orders and communities [in Turkey]

The three-week debate between Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and Fethullah Gülen had a long past that falls under this category. Although the AK Party is powerful, the Gülen movement is not a piece of cake it can swallow easily. The AK Party is a political party that keeps its members together using the power and interests available to a ruling party. The Gülen movement, on the other hand, is an army of volunteers.

Turkey Bars Entry Of Critics By Adding Their Names Next To ISIL Suspects

Turkey has been arbitrarily refusing the entry for foreign nationals of Turkish origin who are deemed critical of the country’s autocratic President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and his government, citing the national security risks.

Book Review: Faith, Theology and Service in Peacebuilding

This book, bringing together key papers from three conferences, offers refreshingly varied, critically nuanced views of Gulen’s thinking and shows the profound impact hizmet has had on particular individuals and societies.

Opposition expresses concern for security of free and fair elections

Opposition parties have repeatedly warned members of the ruling party allegedly involved in graft that they would be held accountable for their corruption. That is the reason why a number of leading members of the AK Party, including Erdoğan, are taking the local elections as a life or death issue for themselves

Gülen says abusive language to cover up sins is hypocrisy

Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen has strongly criticized abusive language and remarks within pro-government circles insulting members of the Hizmet movement, saying this kind of behavior is hypocritical and is being employed to cover up their own sins.

The AKP as a party: Is it Islamic, statist or just opportunist?

The situation is tense these days in Turkey between the ruling Justice and Development Party (AKP) and the Gülen movement.

Latest News

This notable Pocono resident has been living here in exile since 1999

Logistics companies seized over Gülen links sold in fast-track auction

That is Why the Turkish Government could Pay 1 Billion Euros

ECtHR rules Bulgaria violated rights of Turkish journalist who was deported despite seeking asylum

Fethullah Gülen’s Message of Condolences in the Wake of the Western European Floods

Pregnant woman kept in prison for 4 months over Gülen links despite regulations

Normalization of Abduction, Torture, and Death in Erdogan’s Turkey

Turkey’s Maarif Foundation illegally seized German-run school in Ethiopia, says manager

Failed 2016 coup was gov’t plot to purge Gülenists from state bodies, journalist claims

In Case You Missed It

People overwhelmingly support democracy as answer to Kurdish issue

Champion of Turkish schools in Australia dies at 43

Flynn stopped military plan against ISIS that Turkey opposed – after being paid as its agent

Amnesty: 500,000 Kurds displaced in Turkey’s Southeast due to curfews, crackdown

What lies beneath the prep-school row between AK Party and the Hizmet

Afghan Parents Complain to UN Over Detention of Turkish Teachers

Journalist Karaca sentenced to 31 years for slandering al-Qaeda-affiliated group

Copyright 2021 Hizmet News