Tariq Ramadan says Erdoğan should practice what he preached to Mubarak

Islamic scholar Tariq Ramadan speaks in New York. (Photo: AP, Kathy Willens)
Islamic scholar Tariq Ramadan speaks in New York. (Photo: AP, Kathy Willens)


Date posted: January 1, 2014

Prominent scholar Tariq Ramadan, grandson of the founder of the Muslim Brotherhood, has criticized the Turkish prime minister for seeking more power and urged him to rethink staying in power for a longer time.

Ramadan said during his speech at the Reviving Islamic Spirit (RIS) talks in Toronto on Dec. 29, posted to YouTube on Tuesday, that Turkey is not a model for all Muslim-majority countries because its approach to governance is specific to its history.

“And I was critical with that government there, too,” Ramadan said, adding that he had said both in Turkey and when he was at the UN that what Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan once told former Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak — that one day he will have to know how to leave — is true for him as well. “[Erdoğan] also needs to get this right.”

Ramadan stated that having something he called a “very interesting” strategy of going from being a prime minister to being a president is something “you have to think about.” Ramadan was referring to Erdoğan’s plan to shift to a presidential system of government in Turkey and his unannounced ambition to lead the country as president.

He noted that sometimes leaders have to understand that being in power is bound to time and that one day they should leave. “Leave, leave, and let the [other] people come,” Ramadan stressed in his speech.

He deemed his remarks “constructive criticism” — not for the purpose of destruction but for the sharing of ideas. In a bid to assure his audience that he only wants what is best for Turkey, Ramadan said he was also critical of Russian President Vladimir Putin when he switched jobs with current Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev to serve another term as president and that he is voicing similar concerns so as not to see the same thing happen in Turkey.

Throughout his speech, he was also critical of leaders, particularly Islamists, who seek ever more power and warned against the disadvantages of being in power for extended periods.

He said both seculars and Islamists in the Muslim world are talking about the creation of a “civil state with Islamic reference as a nature of the state.” He said he hears similar points when he speaks to Islamists. “No real, deep, clear vision. These are words to please, not meant to implement, and the vision is lacking,” Ramadan said.

He noted that there are other challenges gripping the Muslim world as well, and rampant corruption comes as one of the main challenges people in Muslim-majority countries face. He noted that the second problem is education, and urged Muslim leaders to confront social injustice and the lack of education.

He heavily criticized what he called new “trends” in many countries in the Muslim world, particularly among the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt, in which people seek power.

“You are making mistakes,” Ramadan said. “This is not the right way. You are so obsessed with power because you were in the opposition for 60 years that now you are focused on power. And my position was don’t go for it, don’t go to elections. This is the trap. This is the trap that won’t serve the people. Be the counter-power. Let it be that you are here to serve, not to take over,” Ramadan said.

He noted that he had said similar things about Hamas, a party that rules the Gaza Strip. “You have authority but not the power. They want you to win to end … you,” he added. He said he was surprised when Islamists criticized him for similar remarks he made last year. “What are you talking about?” Ramadan said Islamists asked him. “This is a time for Islamists to celebrate.”

He criticized the Muslim Brotherhood in Egypt for being naïve.

He also said that Egyptian Defense Minister Gen. Abdel Fattah el-Sisi is “a tyrant and a liar” who worked a great deal with US and Israeli forces before. He said the army is playing behind the scenes and that many have failed to see the whole picture.

Source: Today's Zaman , January 1, 2014


Related News

Gülen says talk of raid against Zaman aims to intimidate

Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen, who lives in self-exile in Pennsylvania, said on Thursday that the rumors of a crackdown against Hizmet movement-affiliated media is a “perception operation and aims to intimidate and oppress people.”

Terrorist PKK targets Gulen movement’s schools in Hakkari

Schools opened by the Gülen movement, inspired by internationally respected Turkish scholar Fethullah Gülen, in the eastern province of Hakkari are often threatened by the terrorist Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), according to an interview by the T24 news portal. The first private school the Gülen movement in Hakkari was opened in 2007. There are currently 300 students at the school, Hatice Avcı College.

Veteran out of social security coverage after being dismissed in post-coup purge

Being a veteran is no relief from Turkey’s government witch hunt as M.E.Ç., a former police officer who lost his one ear and eye to clashes with the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) says he cannot benefit from a state-backed social security coverage to undergo a surgery after dismissal.

Erdogan’s False Promises To Africa

The main issue Erdogan raises with his African counterparts is not improving economic and political relations, but the closure of the Gulen movement schools or their transfer to the Turkish Maarif Foundation, which was established solely for this purpose. Mr. Erdogan seems to be using official development assistances and “other financial tools” as carrots to convince African leaders.

Alliance for Shared Values Statement on Detention of Turkish Nationals in Kosovo and Their Imminent Transfer to Turkey

The Alliance for Shared Values denounces the detention of six Turkish nationals in Kosovo on Thursday morning as a result of demands from the Turkish government. This is the latest incident in which the Recep Tayyip Erdogan regime has targeted innocent individuals solely based on affiliation with the Hizmet movement.

Journalist Dumanlı says slanders against Hizmet reminiscent of Feb. 28 era

Zaman daily Editor-in-Chief Dumanlı has described slanderous remarks used by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan and some members of the Justice and Development Party government against the Hizmet movement as highly reminiscent of insults directed at the country’s conservative-minded citizens during the Feb. 28, 1997 “postmodern coup” period.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

Erdoğan’s efforts to destroy the Gulen movement aimed at consolidating his own power and regime

Catholics, Hizmet bring faiths closer in the US

Turkish Deputy PM says he will not visit Gülen amid ‘prep school tension’

4th International Panel for Sharing Coexistence Experience in Korea

Latin American firms seek Turkey investments at TUSKON meet

Wedding gifts will help build dorm and water wells in Tanzania

Bilal Erdogan: Italy names Turkish president’s son in money laundering investigation allegedly connected to political corruption

Copyright 2022 Hizmet News