Multilingual singer Julie Slim breathes life into songs

Lebanese-American singer Julie Slim poses for a photograph before her performance at İstanbul’s Fatih University on Monday. (Photo: Ali Şimşek)
Lebanese-American singer Julie Slim poses for a photograph before her performance at İstanbul’s Fatih University on Monday. (Photo: Ali Şimşek)


Date posted: October 13, 2013

“Music is transformational; it can transform you. It is a way of expression, it connects people, it can be a teaching and therapy tool, it makes people feel things they had not felt before,” Slim told Sunday’s Zaman in an exclusive interview ahead of her performance at Fatih University Conservatory’s Turkish music department.

…there are a few exceptional people who can really make a song a living being by becoming one with it, as music is an irreplaceable part of their lives. Lebanese-American singer-songwriter Julie Slim, who visited İstanbul this week and performed Turkish songs in the city, is one of those people.

Having grown up in a Beirut home listening to Lebanese diva Fairuz, who is called “ambassador to the stars,” and the beautiful voice of her mother singing in French and English, Slim started to pursue her love of music in real terms after she started out in musical theater at college in the US. As the years passed, the singer’s love of music grew deeper and deeper, leading her to sing in multiple languages, including Arabic, Turkish, Armenian and Greek, as well as performing with the ensembles Layalina, Austin Global Orchestra and founding her own band, Rendez Vous.

As an example of her devotion to music, the singer admitted that she endured not speaking or singing for a month last summer after undergoing throat surgery, as she wanted to return to singing that much.

“Music has a language of its own. If you are listening to each other [while performing music], you can have conversations that create musical ecstasy and the highest level of musical achievement,” the singer explained.

Slim’s faith in the communicative power of music helped her revisit her roots when she decided to sing in her mother tongue, Arabic, nearly four years ago. Describing singing in her mother tongue as something magical that makes her feel at home, the singer stated that she began to perform in Arabic after she started singing in the University of Texas’s Middle Eastern ensemble, Bereket.

‘Each language I sing in brings out a different part of me’

It was also thanks to her performance in Bereket that she began to sing in Turkish. Her repertoire of Turkish songs includes “Izdırap” (Misery) and “Biz Dünyaya Ekmeye Geldik” (We Came to the World to Do Good Deeds,” both of which were written by Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen and composed by Azerbaijani composer Ziraddin Taghiyev.

Explaining why she chose to sing these two poems by Gülen instead of some others, Slim felt it was the poems that selected her. “If you cannot feel misery, you cannot feel happiness. … If you are miserable and see the other’s misery, your misery is lessened and you can help the others. ‘Izdırap’ is poetic. … [When I sing the song I feel] sadness, anguish,” Slim stated.

“Biz Dünyaya Ekmeye Geldik,” is more of an inspiring song about dreaming, making your dreams happen and giving yourself to God, according to Slim. “[When I perform this song], I feel like I am calling people to come with me, to live the fullest that you can… [the song says] we are meant to do something here, and let’s do it together,” the singer elaborated.

Source: HizmetMovement.Com , October 13, 2013


Related News

Erdogan Purge Against Gulenists Could Prove Lucrative

The power struggle between the Turkish state and the Fethullah Gulen-led Hizmet Movement continues to reverberate in Turkey. The number detained, arrested, jailed, and dismissed from their jobs since the July 15 coup attempt has reached well over 100,000, 40,000 of whom have been detained on suspicion of having links with Hizmet. One third of the highest-ranking armed forces officers have been dismissed. Almost every major institution—military, judiciary, media, education, business—has been affected.

‘Mission impossible’ for Turkey’s ambassadors

Erdogan has placed an extremely heavy burden on Turkey’s ambassadors. The same ambassadors for many years have been under instructions to promote the schools and activities of the Gulen movement as Turkey’s “biggest and most effective lobbying operation” and to support them.

Followers of Multiple Faiths Join at Columbia University for Iftar

An iftar, a religious ceremony that breaks the fast of Ramadan with a gathering of people, brought together followers of multiple faiths in New York.

CSOs continue to condemn hate speech against Hizmet movement

More civil society organizations from various parts of Turkey held press conferences on Friday to slam hate speech used by the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) government against the Hizmet movement, saying that top government officials should refrain from using hateful rhetoric.

Terrorist PKK targets Gulen movement’s schools in Hakkari

Schools opened by the Gülen movement, inspired by internationally respected Turkish scholar Fethullah Gülen, in the eastern province of Hakkari are often threatened by the terrorist Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK), according to an interview by the T24 news portal. The first private school the Gülen movement in Hakkari was opened in 2007. There are currently 300 students at the school, Hatice Avcı College.

Turkish woman returned to prison immediately after giving birth

Yasemin Baltacı, who was arrested over her alleged links to the Gülen movement just two weeks before the end of her pregnancy, was reportedly returned to Manisa Prison immediately after giving birth in a hospital in Tarsus on Saturday.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

Turkey requests extradition of Fethullah Gülen but not for coup attempt, says US

Gülen: PKK employing tactics similar to those of Feb. 28

Thais demand more Turkish Schools during their visit in Turkey

The Hizmet Community

Gülen’s lawyer dismisses wiretapping claims

Extradition of Turkish Citizens: Moldova to pay 125,000 euros in damages for rights violations

Final Declaration of “Coexistence in Islamic Civilizations and Contemporary Reviews” Conference

Copyright 2022 Hizmet News