Gülen movement makes Turkey more noticeable

Helen Rose Ebough
Helen Rose Ebough


Date posted: January 31, 2011

FATİH VURAL/TUĞBA KAPLAN, İSTANBUL

A sociologist who has studied the faith-based Gülen movement of Turkey extensively has said the movement helps other countries in the world to become more aware of Turkey.

Helen Rose Ebaugh, the author of “The Gülen Movement: A Sociological Analysis of a Civic Movement Rooted in Moderate Islam,” was in İstanbul yesterday where she attended a panel discussion organized by the Journalist and Writers Foundation. Other speakers who took part in the discussion included Ferhat Kentel, Ömer Laçiner and Ali Bulaç.

During her speech, Ebaugh stated that the Gülen movement had opened schools across five continents and in 120 countries, helping to educate the people in these countries and also creating a “society of dialogue.” She said thanks to the activities of these schools, people in those countries have become more knowledgeable about Turkey, saying this has contributed to an overall international awareness of Turkey.

Ebaugh also emphasized that what kept the movement alive and its participants interested were regular “sohbets,” or talks, where religious and philosophical topics are discussed, bringing fellow followers together in a friendly atmosphere. She said she had not met the movement’s founder, Fethullah Gülen, in person, adding that she also had no intention to do so.

Kentel, the dean of the sociology department of Şehir University, praised the book and particularly its focus on organization devotion theory; however, he did criticize the book by saying it was lacking in sociological criticism. Kentel defined the Gülen movement as a movement intended to create a counter-hegemony to the Kemalist regime. “This is why it is a nationalist, right-wing and largely patriarchal movement,” he said.

Researcher Ömer Laçiner criticized Ebaugh’s book for not investigating the political links of the movement. He said Catholic and Protestant groups had formed similar movements in the 18th and 19th centuries, noting that the book should have included a comparison with these movements. He also criticized the movement for being hesitant when it comes to the Alevi and Kurdish questions.

 

Source: Today's Zaman , 14 January 2011


Related News

Military coup documents contain plans to prevent works of Hizmet movement

MUSTAFA GÜRLEK, İSTANBUL Documents retrieved from the General Staff hard disks also feature plans to prevent the works of the Hizmet movement (a.k.a Gulen movement), inspired by the renowned Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen. In the documents, the General Staff’s Information Support Unit discussed how to bring the financial sources of the Hizmet movement under […]

Erdogan Moves to Shut Prep Schools in Blow to Gulen Followers

The issue is important to Gulen’s followers, who teach about 400,000 of the 1.2 million prep school students. The schools offer additional training to students preparing for exams from elementary schools to universities.
Erdogan has so far removed thousands of police officers and prosecutors on suspected ties to Gulen’s movement, while pro-government media has targeted companies for alleged links to the cleric.

Izzettin Dogan: ‘Turkish Olympiads achieved what UN couldn’t

Cem Foundation President Prof. Izzettin Dogan said, in his statements, that the Turkish Olympiads project initiated by volunteer NGOs is of great significance for global peace. “It’s not an easy task to lead children of diverse colors and cultures towards a common goal. Even UN couldn’t achieve that” Dogan said. The Turkish Olympiad students in […]

Did Erdogan stage the coup?

Erdogan called the coup attempt and the excuse to crush his opponents “a gift from God.” But was the coup really “a gift from God” or was it Erdogan’s gift to himself? Was it Turkey’s equivalent of the Reichstag Fire?

The Islamic roots of the conflict in Turkey

he roots of the Gülen movement go back to Said Nursi (1878-1960), a preacher from Eastern Anatolia whose teachings (the Nurcu movement) emphasized the compatibility of Islam with rationalism, science and positivism. Nursi’s main contribution to Islam was a 6,000-page commentary he wrote on the Quran. This body of work is known as the “Risale-i Nur” (The Light Collection) and advocates the teaching of modern sciences in religious schools as the way of the future for an Islamic age of enlightenment.

US Human Rights Report: Tens of thousands jailed in Turkey with little clarity on charges

The 2016 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices — the Human Rights Reports — released by the US State Department on Friday said that Turkish courts had imprisoned tens of thousands of people with little clarity on charges and evidence over their alleged links with a failed coup in July 2016 that was blamed on the Gülen movement.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

Ethiopian Minister of Foreign Affairs holds talks with TUSKON delegation

Turkish organizations pour out aid during Feast of Sacrifice

UN demands access to 3 Turks forcibly returned from Malaysia

Newly-released journo offers insider view at victims of Turkey Purge

Gulen movement’s three pillars

Hizmet’s approach to politics and politicians

Turkish Olympiad Finals add a festive air to Kiev

Copyright 2022 Hizmet News