Kimse Yok Mu hosts international experts for social media benefits conference

The keynote speaker for Friday's meeting was Andrei Abramov, the former chief of the NGO branch of the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). (Photo: Today's Zaman, Mehmet Yaman)
The keynote speaker for Friday's meeting was Andrei Abramov, the former chief of the NGO branch of the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). (Photo: Today's Zaman, Mehmet Yaman)


Date posted: May 18, 2015

ZEYNEP KARATAŞ / ISTANBUL

The Kimse Yok Mu (Is Anyone There?) Foundation hosted an international conference titled “Social Media for Good” in Istanbul on Friday, drawing a wide range of international experts in journalism and social media to discuss ways of making positive contributions via the Internet.

The keynote speaker for Friday’s meeting was Andrei Abramov, the former chief of the NGO branch of the United Nations Economic and Social Council (ECOSOC). He noted, “The role of information and communications technology (ICT) has been, and continues to be, crucial to the development of an effective and beneficial global civil society, since they enable the necessary interconnectedness across borders, the free flow of ideas, the exchange of thoughts and the process of consensus building that form the backbone of a civil society of global scope.”

Abromov added: “We must extend the benefits of information and telecommunication technologies to every citizen in the world. We must bridge the digital divide and turn it into a digital opportunity.” In this vein, Zainul Abid Kottakulath of BBC News India gave a presentation titled “Hashtags of Hope: How Social Media has transformed the World into a Better Place” during which he discussed ways in which social media can draw global attention to an underreported issues, prompting government action and altering the focus of mainstream media.

Kottakulath also mentioned an interesting development. The Facebook Safety Check, which was launched in October 2014, detects when the Facebook user is located near major natural disasters, and asks whether the user is safe. The user can simply click the “I am safe” button, and Facebook will post this information to the user’s profile.

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg commented in reference to the new application: “When disasters happen, people need to know their loved ones are safe. It’s moments like this that being able to connect really matters.” Kottakulath also stressed that social media has influenced the ways in which people engage in activism, often by using hashtags and sharing posts. Social media activism is often called “clicktivism” or “slacktivism,” and its effectiveness is a subject of much debate.

As the speaker explained, “Even though online campaigns make an impression in cyberspace, they are also perceived as being passive and lazy.” In another presentation titled “The Role of Social Media for NGO’s Working to Create Awareness Around and Prevent Online Victimization,” experts discussed the potential negative outcomes that that accompany the widespread use and advancement of social media.

Today’s Zaman asked the speaker, Professor Jaishankar Karuppan of Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, about the current problem of teams of Internet trolls (often referred to as AK trolls), who are commissioned to target and harass oppositional media by the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party).

“I think that some governments are against citizens who are politically active. It is something that happens in the US as well, when people like [Edward] Snowden reveal government secrets. [It depends] on who is tagging on which side of the fence. One man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom fighter, and this carries over online. So probably, what the activist is doing, the government sees as an attack,” Karuppan responded, adding that it is unethical on the part of the government to engage in attacks on social media.

Source: Today's Zaman , May 15, 2015


Related News

Kimse Yok Mu gears up to assist Malian refugees

Kimse Yok Mu continues its help to Malians left homeless in the ongoing civil war around the country. Donations delivered to the country are ready to be distributed. Building bridges between philanthropists and the needy, Kimse Yok Mu has once again taken action to aid war-stricken people of Mali. The association, which has delivered donations […]

Where does Gülen stand on: democracy, human rights, and minorities?

Gülen recognizes democracy as the only viable political system of governance. He denounces turning religion into a political ideology, while encouraging all citizens to take an informed and responsible part in political life of their country. He stresses the flexibilities in the Islamic principles relating to governance and their compatibility with a true democracy.

ICG report praises reformist role Hizmet plays in [Kurdish] settlement process

A recent report released by the International Crisis Group (ICG) on Turkey’s efforts to address the Kurdish issue has praised the positive role the faith-based Hizmet movement plays in the settlement process. The report, titled “Crying Wolf: Why Turkish Fears Need Not Block Kurdish Reform,” released on Monday.

US Unlikely to ‘Speed Up’ Gulen’s Extradition to Turkey

Turkey has formally requested that the U.S. government extradite Turkish cleric Fethullah Gulen from the state of Pennsylvania where he has lived in self-imposed exile for 17 years. Turkey is pushing for quick extradition, suggesting that U.S.-Turkish relations are at stake. But the burden of proof rests squarely on Ankara, and if it cannot sufficiently prove its accusations against Gulen, the extradition request will be refused.

UN Human Rights: Turkey should promptly end its protracted state of emergency

Routine extensions of the state of emergency in Turkey have led to profound human rights violations against hundreds of thousands of people – from arbitrary deprivation of the right to work and to freedom of movement, to torture and other ill-treatment, arbitrary detentions and infringements of the rights to freedom of association and expression, according to a report* issued by the UN Human Rights Office on Tuesday.

Thousands pay final respects to Gülen’s brother in Erzurum

Seyfullah Gülen, who died at the age of 72 on Friday and was the brother of Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen, was laid to rest in a funeral attended by thousands of people in the eastern province of Erzurum on Sunday.

Latest News

This notable Pocono resident has been living here in exile since 1999

Logistics companies seized over Gülen links sold in fast-track auction

That is Why the Turkish Government could Pay 1 Billion Euros

ECtHR rules Bulgaria violated rights of Turkish journalist who was deported despite seeking asylum

Fethullah Gülen’s Message of Condolences in the Wake of the Western European Floods

Pregnant woman kept in prison for 4 months over Gülen links despite regulations

Normalization of Abduction, Torture, and Death in Erdogan’s Turkey

Turkey’s Maarif Foundation illegally seized German-run school in Ethiopia, says manager

Failed 2016 coup was gov’t plot to purge Gülenists from state bodies, journalist claims

In Case You Missed It

Local Look – The Turkish Cultural Center of New Hampshire

Turkey’s efforts in Somalia

Fethullah Gulen and Gulen Movement Discussed at German Symposium

Rumi Peace and Dialogue Awards given in Washington

Erdoğan to US: What verdict? What court for terrorists?

Turkish Olympiads close with perfect ceremony

Gulen Schools Fight Provokes New Tensions in Bosnia

Copyright 2021 Hizmet News