Proof of the ‘parallel state’

Prof. Mumtazer Turkone
Prof. Mumtazer Turkone


Date posted: April 28, 2014

MÜMTAZER TÜRKÖNE

The prime minister’s case is similar to that of the “Boy who cried wolf.” It is the famous Aesop’s fable about a boy who deceived villagers a few times but lost his credibility after his lies were discovered.Thus, in the face of a real threat, he was unable to make anyone believe him. Before large crowds of people, the prime minister made big claims. He said he would back up his claims shortly but still cannot prove them after a long time.Referring to a news story that appeared in the pro-government media about unfounded allegations about the police, Bülent Arınç, the second man in the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party), had said, “A dignified person should not speak without evidence.” Arınç’s words are now being used by opposition parties to criticize the prime minister.

The prime minister did two things to halt graft investigations. He rendered the judiciary and the judicial police completely dysfunctional and thereby blocked the enforcement of court rulings. Second, he created an enemy and used it as a scapegoat. This enemy is referred to as the “parallel state.” The prime minister claims an organization has penetrated the state apparatus and used the powers and authorities it has obtained to accuse the government of corruption. He maintains that the Hizmet movement, which is a civil/religious movement, is this “parallel state.” The prime minister voices this claim with a charming rhetoric and makes the media organizations he controls produce false stories about this “parallel state,” but he cannot produce any evidence to back up his claim.

To defend such a serious claim without proof, one must dispense with all logic. A pro-government media organization recently ran a story titled “Proof of the parallel state.” This story claimed a report prepared by the prosecutor who conducted an investigation into some National Intelligence Organization (MİT) members in 2012 had referred to Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan as the “prime minister of the time” and that this is proof of the “coup.” The prosecutor’s diligence in correctly identifying the prime minister has become “proof” of the parallel state at the hands of the pro-government media.

The ruling AK Party has been controlling the state apparatus for 12 years. The weakest link in the parallel state rhetoric is that the existence of such a network clearly indicates the ineptitude of the government in dealing with it. The prime minister places the blame of all unlawful events in the country on the parallel state. These events include notorious wiretapped phone conversations and video recordings. Whenever someone criticizes him, the prime minister claims his/her phone conversations were wiretapped or that there are video recordings of him/her. These recordings are reportedly similar to the one which forced former Republican People’s Party (CHP) leader Deniz Baykal to resign from office. Lately, the prime minister has voiced similar claims about Constitutional Court President Haşim Kılıç and the chief of General Staff. These claims have an ulterior motive. It is very likely that the prime minister is blackmailing Kılıç in response to Kılıç’s criticisms about violations of the rule of law and freedoms. It also follows that there is a problem between the prime minister and the chief of General Staff.

The government shut down YouTube and Twitter in an unlawful manner. It has the power and ability to have access to all wiretappings and private information. It may sound like a great joke to you but shouldn’t the parallel state which is conducting all those illegal recordings be at the disposal of the prime minister? The proof is in the prime minister’s words. For four months, he fought against a “parallel state” specter but couldn’t produce any evidence. On the other hand, it is only he who knows who was wiretapped.

Source: Todays Zaman , April 28, 2014


Related News

Islamic scholar Gülen criticizes Turkish gov’t response to Gezi protests

Gülen said he had heard of Turkish officials’ efforts to “undermine Turkish schools abroad” which are run by his movement in many countries across the world. “Unfortunately, this appetite for destruction pushes all fair limits. These schools were established through the great self-sacrifice of the people of Anatolia,” he said.

US Human Rights Report: Tens of thousands jailed in Turkey with little clarity on charges

The 2016 Country Reports on Human Rights Practices — the Human Rights Reports — released by the US State Department on Friday said that Turkish courts had imprisoned tens of thousands of people with little clarity on charges and evidence over their alleged links with a failed coup in July 2016 that was blamed on the Gülen movement.

Hakan Şükür’s resignation: Rebellion of a conscience

Take a look at his wedding photo: on one side of a table is Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen and on the other is Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan. That photo reflects the feelings of millions. Şükür’s resignation is a sign that to him, that photo was torn up. If the government continues to keep up its hostile attitude against the Hizmet movement led by Gülen, millions will experience the same feeling. The real risk is here.

8.5-month pregnant woman under arrest though baby faces heart, kidney problems

With only days to go before the delivery, a Kayseri woman is still held under arrest even though her baby has heart and kidney problems. If she was not under arrest, the baby would have been treated before it was born.

Turkey’s permanent state of crisis

However, Erdogan has a problem: Whereas Ataturk came to power as a military general, Erdogan has a democratic mandate to govern. Ataturk’s Turkey was rural and only 10 percent of the country was literate at the time, with most educated people supporting his agenda. Erdogan’s Turkey is 80 percent urban and nearly 100 percent literate, and many well-educated Turks oppose his agenda.

Lawyer Karahan: Hate crimes against Hizmet can be prosecuted at ECtHR, ICC

The Savings Deposit Insurance Fund (TMSF) has taken over management control of some of the privileged shares of Bank Asya as part of a government-operated crackdown on institutions affiliated with the Gülen movement, also known as Hizmet, and shareholders will be filing a lawsuit against the action, but this week’s guest for Monday Talk has said it is likely that the case will end up at the European Court of Human Rights and even at the International Criminal Court.

Latest News

ECtHR rules Bulgaria violated rights of Turkish journalist who was deported despite seeking asylum

Fethullah Gülen’s Message of Condolences in the Wake of the Western European Floods

Pregnant woman kept in prison for 4 months over Gülen links despite regulations

Normalization of Abduction, Torture, and Death in Erdogan’s Turkey

Turkey’s Maarif Foundation illegally seized German-run school in Ethiopia, says manager

Failed 2016 coup was gov’t plot to purge Gülenists from state bodies, journalist claims

Grondahl: Turkish community strong in wake of threats from back home

Turkish-Kyrgyz educator’s abduction shows Ankara’s ruthless disregard for law: HRW

Kenya: Investigate Deportation of Turkish National

In Case You Missed It

Secretary Tillerson: Evidence against Gulen provided by Turkey inadequate, while voluminous

İstanbul hosts dialogue leaders to discuss tolerance in education

NTIC Alumni urges Turkish govt not to close schools

Crackdown in Turkey felt in Capital Region

Islam’s need for enlightenment

Shocking change and disappointed hearts…

Gülen’s education model discussed at Indonesia conference

Copyright 2021 Hizmet News