Graft probe in Turkey: Path and passengers

Orhan Miroğlu
Orhan Miroğlu


Date posted: December 26, 2013

ORHAN MİROĞLU

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan delivered a brief speech to a group at the airport after coming back from Pakistan.

In the speech, he made reference to the journey he took with his companions in the past. The prime minister said: “I am not asking you about the journey. I am asking you about the companions on the journey. What is the journey for if you have no companions? First companions, then a journey. … This is how we went on the journey.”

The Hizmet movement and the Justice and Development Party (AK Party) took the voyage together. Both seemed happy traveling along the same path holding onto the same goals. The Hizmet movement and the AK Party were two major dynamics in the struggle to attain democratic change. Eleven years have passed. Disagreements emerged. The Hizmet movement did not extend its support for the Mavi Marmara incident, the Oslo process or some of the choices made by the government in the field of foreign policy. The Hizmet movement opposed the political choices of the government with respect to the Kurdish question since the Oslo talks. But all these have never led a conflict between the two parties.

In the meantime, Turkey preferred direct talks with İmralı by leaving international actors out of the process. The Hizmet movement remained distant to this process of dialogue with the Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) and Abdullah Öcalan as well.

As a result, more disagreements between these companions emerged after the end of the fight and struggle against coups and the military guardianship. On Dec. 17, the parties took up their positions to fight which could lead to irreversible outcomes. The parting of ways between these companions refers to some sort of loneliness. But it will not be wrong to argue that the Hizmet movement will suffer from this state of loneliness more as time passes by. Other companions still remain on the path together with the government. It is not possible to speculate on whether mass support for the AK Party will decline after Dec. 17 and whether the operations would affect the outcomes of the March 30 elections. The parting of ways also means the pursuit of new alliances. The greatest difficulty for the Hizmet movement, an influential and leading actor in Turkey, is that it represents a fairly different tradition and identity which makes it hard for it to cooperate with another political actor.

If we leave the AK Party-Hizmet movement aside, it could be said that the Hizmet movement has never gotten along with the following political actors and the ideologies they represent:

Republican People’s Party (CHP) — neo-nationalist-secularist circles

Nationalist Movement Party (MHP) — the traditional representative of Turkish nationalism

Peace and Democracy Party (BDP)/Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) — representing the Kurdish political movement

Could the Hizmet movement become a new partner, as a leading civilian and obviously political movement, in a new alliance due to its disagreement with the AK Party? Some think this is unlikely whereas some believe that it is possible.

Maybe making alliances in politics is not something achievable in a very short period of time. But it is obvious that the former companions will be hurt by the current conflict. I am also aware of the great harm that this will do to Turkey as well. The most important political repercussion of the escalating tension between the parties is the fact that democracy and the new Turkey will be left defenseless.

The problem is not to side with the Hizmet movement or the AK Party. No one objects to the fight against corruption. But it is not possible to argue that what has been happening is all about corruption right now.

Tensions should not be escalated or provoked further. I believe that promoting reconciliation is the best option. If you ask whether or not it possible, I would say, “Yes, it is still possible.”

Source: Today's Zaman , December 26, 2013


Related News

Scholars at Abant Meeting call for EU negotiations, domestic reform

Menekse Tokyay for Southeast European Times As Turkey’s EU bid has stalled, a group of prominent scholars agree that negotiations can only proceed if Turkey advances democracy, drafts a new civilian constitution and resolves of the Kurdish issue. The Abant Platform has long been a progressive force in Turkey, bringing together intellectuals to debate and […]

Hizmet and current political debates in Turkey

The Journalists and Writers Foundation (GYV), whose honorary chairman is well-respected Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen, released a statement on its website on Thursday explaining the stance of the Hizmet [service] movement (also know as Gulen movement) inspired by Gülen as a civilian one with no political ambitions. The association’s statement comes in response to […]

Veteran out of social security coverage after being dismissed in post-coup purge

Being a veteran is no relief from Turkey’s government witch hunt as M.E.Ç., a former police officer who lost his one ear and eye to clashes with the outlawed Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK) says he cannot benefit from a state-backed social security coverage to undergo a surgery after dismissal.

What do Alevis want?

Alevis have been traditionally considering themselves a minority because their interpretation of Islam differs from the state’s understanding. In such a climate, the Abant Platform organized [a Gulen Movement affiliated organization] a three-day-long meeting by Lake Abant over the weekend, bringing representatives from the Alevi and Sunni community. Personally, I learned a lot from the meeting which almost served as a channel for venting for Alevis.

Our three-month ordeal in Turkey’s maximum prison -Nigerian students detained over coup saga

Notwithstanding such aims and the benefits to Turkish citizens and others around the globe who enjoy scholarship and the benefits of quality education, all such pro-Gülen educational organisations, including the ones established in Nigeria have been branded as enemies by the Turkish government. “I have never heard that the Turkish schools in Nigeria have done anything illegally since the time they began operation in Nigeria; I attended one of such excellent schools so, I see no reason why the school should be closed,” Mohamed said.

NBA player and Erdoğan-critic Enes Kanter’s father arrest in Turkey

Dr. Mehmet Kanter, father of NBA player and Turkish government-critic Enes Kanter has been arrested in Instanbul. This comes days after Turkish officials issued an arrest warrant for the US-based basketball player and seeked assistance from Interpol to extradite him to Turkey.

Latest News

Fethullah Gülen’s Condolence Message for South African Human Rights Defender Archbishop Desmond Tutu

Hizmet Movement Declares Core Values with Unified Voice

Ankara systematically tortures supporters of Gülen movement, Kurds, Turkey Tribunal rapporteurs say

Erdogan possessed by Pharaoh, Herod, Hitler spirits?

Devious Use of International Organizations to Persecute Dissidents Abroad: The Erdogan Case

A “Controlled Coup”: Erdogan’s Contribution to the Autocrats’ Playbook

Why is Turkey’s Erdogan persecuting the Gulen movement?

Purge-victim man sent back to prison over Gulen links despite stage 4 cancer diagnosis

University refuses admission to woman jailed over Gülen links

In Case You Missed It

Turkish Cultural Center Holds Annual Friendship Dinner

ISIS ‘Infiltrates’ Erdogan’s Maarif Foundation

Gülen’s attorney: Media speculation about extradition not true

Cambodian education minister: I’m proud of Turkish school students

HIzmet centre takes on Erdogan regime

Kimse Yok Mu reaches out to refugee families in Afghanistan

Land tender won by TUSKON reopened in defiance of court decision

Copyright 2022 Hizmet News