Turkey’s treatment of dismissed officials reminiscent of Nazis: Luxembourg

Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses his supporters at the parliament in Ankara, Turkey / Photo: AP
Turkey's Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan addresses his supporters at the parliament in Ankara, Turkey / Photo: AP


Date posted: November 9, 2016

Luxembourg’s foreign minister said on Monday that the Turkish government’s handling of civil servants dismissed after a failed coup attempt reminded him of methods used by the Nazis, and that sooner or later the EU would have to respond with sanctions.

But Berlin appeared to dismiss the idea, saying it was important to keep channels open to a key partner in fighting terrorism.

More than 110,000 public servants – from soldiers and judges to teachers, politicians and journalists – have been detained, suspended or sacked since the failed military coup in July, in what President Tayyip Erdogan’s critics say has turned into a crackdown on all forms of dissent.

Turkish officials say the measures are justified by the threat posed by the coup attempt, in which more than 240 people were killed as rogue soldiers commandeered fighter jets and tanks, bombing parliament and other buildings.

The names of those barred from public service are published in the official government gazette, potentially making it hard for them to find work elsewhere. In addition, their passports are canceled.

Luxembourg Foreign Minister Jean Asselborn said people were also being stripped of their university degrees, and that many were being left with no income. Some dismissed teachers who were sole breadwinners have complained of being unable to feed their families.

“To put it bluntly, these are methods that were used during the Nazi era and that’s a really, really bad development,” Asselborn said.

He suggested imposing economic sanctions, pointing out that 50 percent of NATO member and EU aspirant Turkey’s exports go to the EU and 60 percent of investment in Turkey comes from the bloc.

“At a certain point in time, we won’t have any choice but to apply it (sanctions) to counteract the unbearable human rights situation.”

The German government poured cold water on the proposal.

Interior Minister Thomas De Maiziere said while it was important to criticize the arrests of politicians and the limitation of press freedom, one should also keep in mind that Turkey, bordering Syria and Iraq, was a key ally in the fight against terrorism.

“A differentiated look, also to safeguard our interests, is the right approach,” De Maiziere told fellow party members of the conservative bloc.

Chancellor Angela Merkel’s spokesman said Berlin would not get involved in discussion about potential sanctions.

“We have to make it clear to Turkey what impact the repression of the press and the repression of the opposition will have on its relations with the European Union,” Steffen Seibert told a regular government news conference.

“That’s why it’s important to keep the channels of communication open.”

Erdogan says Turkey alone can decide how to respond to the coup attempt, which they accuse U.S.-based Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen of orchestrating through a network of supporters. Gulen has condemned the action and denied any involvement.

Turkey’s EU Minister Omer Celik said Ankara’s actions should be equated to efforts to “protect democracy during the fight against the Nazis”.

“The Nazis are like apprentices when compared with Gulenist terror organizations … We are talking about an organization that has massacred its own people with warplanes, tanks, warships and helicopters. Nobody should think that we will take a step back in our fight against them.”

Erdogan said on Sunday he did not care if Europe called him a dictator and accused European nations of abetting terrorism by supporting Kurdish militants.

Turkey has also threatened to cancel a deal with the EU to prevent refugees from the Middle East crossing into Europe in return for an acceleration of its EU membership application and visa-free entry for Turks.


(Reporting by Michelle Martin and Andreas Rinke in Berlin and Tulay Karadeniz in Ankara,; Writing by Michael Nienaber; Editing by Kevin Liffey)

Source: Reuters , November 7, 2016


Related News

Silence of the (AKP) lambs

Erdoğan risks his own Islamic beliefs just to lead his voters to believe that Gülen and his followers are not Muslims, but puppets and even agents of the United States Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) — just like Ivan Watson of CNN International! — and Mossad. Erdoğan also keeps claiming that Fethullah Gülen and Hizmet movement supporters are terrorists.

Pro-gov’t columnist still threatening fellow journalists

A columnist for the pro-government daily Yeni Şafak, Cem Küçük, continues to target journalists critical of the government for regular intimidation in his column.On Jan. 16, Küçük argued that an operation will be staged against newspapers with ties to the Hizmet movement and that the journalists who work in those newspapers would be brought to trial. He also said that the Journalists and Writers Foundation (GYV) would be tried over its press releases.

Neither Erdoğan nor EU the same after five years

Erdoğan is going to Brussels as the prime minister of Turkey who doesn’t even have ambassadors in three of its region’s important capital; Cairo, Tel Aviv and Damascus. A negotiation chapter was opened in November 2013 after a three-year freeze. Erdoğan had to sack the former EU minister from the cabinet because of the allegations in relation with a major graft probe in December 2013 and appointed Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu to that post.

The lethal and bitter aftermath of Turkey’s failed coup

The purge hurries Turkey on its way to what was already looking increasingly inevitable as its unfortunate destination: an illiberal executive presidency with a fading democratic lustre and Recep Tayyip Erdogan ruling more or less unchecked and unrivalled until he dies or steps down.

Turkey’s picture on freedom of the press bleak on WPFD

FATMA DİŞLİ ZIBAK Journalists who have taken the opportunity to reflect on the thorny issue of freedom of the press in Turkey on the occasion of World Press Freedom Day (WPFD), which is marked every May 3, have drawn a bleak picture, speaking about the various problems that restrict freedom of the press in the […]

Kosovo investigates seizure of Turkish nationals

Kosovo authorities are investigating the arrest and extradition of six Turkish citizens, which activists said represented a violation of human rights, Prime Minister Ramush Haradinaj said on Saturday.

Latest News

This notable Pocono resident has been living here in exile since 1999

Logistics companies seized over Gülen links sold in fast-track auction

That is Why the Turkish Government could Pay 1 Billion Euros

ECtHR rules Bulgaria violated rights of Turkish journalist who was deported despite seeking asylum

Fethullah Gülen’s Message of Condolences in the Wake of the Western European Floods

Pregnant woman kept in prison for 4 months over Gülen links despite regulations

Normalization of Abduction, Torture, and Death in Erdogan’s Turkey

Turkey’s Maarif Foundation illegally seized German-run school in Ethiopia, says manager

Failed 2016 coup was gov’t plot to purge Gülenists from state bodies, journalist claims

In Case You Missed It

Former US envoys to Ankara say Erdoğan doing great harm to democracy

‘Young Turks’ Of Bridge Building

AFSV Statement on Temporary US Travel and Immigration Ban

Flautre: Investigation into Taraf daily, journalist over MGK docs ‘scandalous’

Canadian institute honors Kimse Yok Mu

Ergenekon suspect convicted for insulting Gulen

Fethullah Gülen’s Message for Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Copyright 2021 Hizmet News