Or is it Gülenophobia?


Date posted: February 14, 2012

Turkey’s frequently changing agenda has recently been dominated by one issue: An İstanbul prosecutor overseeing an investigation into a Kurdistan Workers’ Party (PKK)-linked terrorist organization has asked the Ankara Prosecutor’s Office to hear the testimony of National Intelligence Organization (MİT) Undersecretary Hakan Fidan and has obtained arrest warrants for four other MİT agents.

MERVE BÜŞRA ÖZTÜRK, 14 February 2012, Tuesday

Different subjects of discussion derive from this issue. Recently, in a heated debate among Turkish columnists, claims have emerged that there has been a conflict between the Turkish scholar Fethullah Gülen’s community and the government, specifically the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party).

In his article titled “I see Gülen people everywhere,” referencing a line from the movie “The Sixth Sense,” Taraf’s Yıldıray Oğur explained how he thinks there is a tendency among Turkish people to speak of the Gülen community as if it is a covert organization. Oğur argues the opposite, saying that for 30 years a great number of sociologists and political scientists have written on and studied the Gülen community — there are hundreds of schools founded by the community. However, Oğur says, the Gülen community is treated as if it is a small tribe in the Amazon. “We have seen enough of the community’s moves and policies for 30 years to say that it is not a community that opposes the AK Party. What I find even more unreasonable is that the prosecutors and police who were declared heroes of democracy when investigations were conducted into the terrorist organization Ergenekon are now criticized for allegedly being Gülen supporters. What is the reason behind this change in reaction?” asks Oğur, suggesting it may be a fear of Gülen and his followers.

Bugün’s Nuh Gönültaş feels if we are to accept that the Gülen community disagrees with the government and that the prosecutor’s suspicion of MİT agents is the community’s doing, then we have to think about what it would gain by doing such a thing. “Technically, the Gülen community is not a structure that can be considered as opposition to the AK Party. So the government and the community are not rivals or necessarily in opposition. Another important fact that should not go unnoticed is that the Gülen community stands on its own feet and does not receive any financial support from the government. So how can we discuss the political influence of the Gülen community when for years it has emphasized its non-political stance?” On the other hand, Radikal’s Cengiz Çandar noted that those who are known to be supporters of Gülen openly support the prosecutor’s move with regards to MİT and, in this respect, criticize a bill that was presented by the government to Parliament last week in which specially authorized prosecutors would have to receive permission from the prime minister before taking legal action against MİT agents. Çandar then asked if the Gülen community has nothing to do with the prosecutor’s decision about the MİT agents, then why are they so clear about their stance opposing the government?

Source: Today’s Zaman http://www.todayszaman.com/columnist-271402-or-is-it–gulenophobia.html

 


Related News

Will Gülen Movement schools offer Kurdish-medium education?

Journalists and Writers Foundation Vice-President Cemal Ussak, regarding the Kurdish-medium education at the Gülen community schools in southeastern Turkey, said “It is a matter of course following the amendment to the current regulation.” Vice-president of Journalists and Writers Foundation, regarded as the institutional face of Gülen Movement, Cemal Ussak brought to minds the fact that the movement’s […]

Police insult former Zaman columnist for not supporting Erdoğan

Speaking with the Cumhuriyet daily about his last visit to journalists in Silivri Prison in İstanbul, main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) İstanbul deputy Mehmet Bekaroğlu said that journalists, including Bulaç, were insulted by police officers during their questioning.

Turkey, ‘The Devil’s Advocate’ and ‘Titanic’

Questions to challenge the primary and unjustified premise: What judicial (or other) process determined that these corruption investigations were a coup attempt against the government? What proof or evidence do you have to support this most serious claim? What disciplinary process did you undertake to determine that the people that were purged were members and culprits of this ‘coup’? In the absence of evidence and disciplinary process how did you determine these people’s association with Hizmet? When is government corruption not a judicial coup? How can you have the right to unilaterally determine the intent and purpose of these ongoing judicial investigations when your government is implicated in them? If your government can purge over 7,000 police officers (and thereby affect and prevent these investigations) without evidence, due process or disciplinary procedure, do you not set a precedent for every future potentially corrupt government to follow?

Opposition deputy: Police detain one more woman shortly after delivery

B.Ö., a Turkish woman who gave birth on Thursday in the Turkish province of Adana, was detained ealy later the same day over alleged links to Turkey’s Gülen group. Sezgin Tanrıkulu, a Turkish deputy from the main opposition Republican People’s Party (CHP) has called on Turkish authorities to stop the practice of detaining women hours after giving birth.

Escape from Turkey’s parallel reality

As a law-abiding citizen, I knew I had done nothing wrong to be stopped at the border. But in Turkey being a journalist from Zaman media group was enough for me to be considered an “enemy of the state.” And I was the editor-in-chief of Today’s Zaman which had been brutally taken over a few days earlier, earning me a suspended jail sentence for my tweets criticizing then-Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoğlu.

Turkey’s Economy Suffering Enormous Post-Coup Purges

Since the attempted military coup on July 15, the government, empowered by a state of emergency, has fired or suspended about 125,000 people, of whom nearly 40,000 have been arrested, and tens of thousands of others taken into custody. As a result, roughly 800,000 people have been completely cut off from any economic safety net.

Latest News

This notable Pocono resident has been living here in exile since 1999

Logistics companies seized over Gülen links sold in fast-track auction

That is Why the Turkish Government could Pay 1 Billion Euros

ECtHR rules Bulgaria violated rights of Turkish journalist who was deported despite seeking asylum

Fethullah Gülen’s Message of Condolences in the Wake of the Western European Floods

Pregnant woman kept in prison for 4 months over Gülen links despite regulations

Normalization of Abduction, Torture, and Death in Erdogan’s Turkey

Turkey’s Maarif Foundation illegally seized German-run school in Ethiopia, says manager

Failed 2016 coup was gov’t plot to purge Gülenists from state bodies, journalist claims

In Case You Missed It

London newspaper forced to shut as Erdogan allies seek vengeance

Hizmet movement and military coups

Can the EU be blamed for Erdoğan’s authoritarianism?

Debating the constitution

Why is Erdoğan hostile to Turkish schools?

Human Rights Watch: People being tortured, abducted in post-coup Turkey

TUSKON challenges Erdoğan to enter business, defies threats

Copyright 2021 Hizmet News