I’m ashamed

Abdulhamit Bilici
Abdulhamit Bilici


Date posted: December 27, 2013

ABDÜLHAMİT BİLİCİ

Democratic countries have well-established principles and procedures to be followed if an egregious scandal erupts.

The most important principle is that any investigation should be conducted freely and in such a manner that suspicion is impossible. Even the slightest indication of an attempt to meddle with the judiciary and the police leading the investigation is considered suicide in a democratic country because such actions give the impression that a cover-up is underway.

Media outlets apply journalistic standards in freely deciding to run stories and publish confidential information that they deem is in the public’s interest.

No one is considered guilty unless proven so. The principle of presumption of innocence should be our primary guiding principle. Yet those who, by the very nature of their positions, are capable of influencing or inhibiting the investigation should either resign or be removed from office until they are acquitted.

Former German President Christian Wulff resigned immediately when the media reported that he hadn’t informed the state assembly of a personal loan of 500,000 euros he obtained from the wife of an affluent friend — not because the police found millions of dollars stashed in shoeboxes and strongboxes in his bedroom or because he was bribed. “The public trust in me has been undermined. Therefore, I resign,” he said. He has since retreated to a monastery to be cleansed.

Another example is four-star Gen. David Petraeus, who was appointed by US President Barack Obama as the head of one of the most important agencies in the country, the CIA. An FBI investigation into threatening emails received by a friend of the CIA director found that he was having an extramarital affair. Even the individualistic society of the US couldn’t tolerate this scandal, which mainly concerned the private life of Petraeus, as such an affair could be leveraged to blackmail the head of a critical agency to the detriment of US interests.

As soon as the affair was publicized, Petraeus resigned. “After being married for over 37 years, I showed extremely poor judgment by engaging in an extramarital affair. Such behavior is unacceptable, both as a husband and as the leader of an organization such as ours,” he said in an email to all CIA employees. Although he was considered a potential candidate for president, he opted to take a back seat. A slew of conspiracy theories dominated conversations in marginal circles, but the country did not move one inch away from the principles of democracy, transparency, morality and rule of law.

I couldn’t believe my ears when I first heard the news stories about the İstanbul Chief Public Prosecutor’s Office’s graft probe involving several ministers, ministers’ sons, a general manager of a public bank, a mayor and a number of businessmen. Then I was surprised to read the claims and documents reported by the media about trusted people, some of whom I have met in recent years, as well as their relatives. As I read on through the records of legally wiretapped the phone calls, I learned of bribery, gifts and abuse, and learned that the perpetrators were senior members of the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) — a party for which I voted, which I supported in hard times, which claimed to promote honest and fair policies — my amazement turned into disappointment.

As a consolation, I said to myself: “Well, there may be few who falter and do wrong. We are all human beings. We are a democratic country just like Germany and the US. They will resign and they may be tried and later acquitted. ” Further developments, however, turned my disappointment into a serious pessimism about the country’s future. Indeed, the public officials who exposed the scandal weren’t rewarded; rather, the prosecutors who were conducting the probe were quickly blocked. Moreover, the top police chief in İstanbul was removed from office. Simultaneously, numerous police chiefs in Ankara and other cities were sacked. Instead of focusing on the concrete evidence, officials fabricated conspiracy theories about the US and Israel. During this time, the ministers who were charged with serious accusations refused to resign.

A defamation campaign was kicked off to demonize the Hizmet movement — just as the “deep state” would do in the past — and a witch hunt was launched in various state organs. Despite the fact that the prep school debate started months ago, the probe was portrayed as part of it.

Now, my disappointment has turned into shame. I am ashamed of the fact that the reverse of what would happen in a normal democracy is currently happening in my country, and the fact that our media outlets and intellectuals are acting so unethically. I hope those who caused all this to happen to our country feel a bit ashamed. My God endow us with understanding, fairness, straightforwardness and affection.

Source: Today's Zaman , December 27, 2013


Related News

After The Coup Attempt, A Crackdown In Turkey

Once considered a beacon of hope for the Middle East, Turkey has been rapidly backsliding on issues of democracy, freedom of the press, and human rights. One would have thought this downfall hit bottom on July 15, when a bloody coup was attempted, leaving behind more than 250 dead.

Gulen Movement Educates Kurds, and not Everyone Is Happy

Nicolas Birch,  Turkey There is a studious silence in the basement floor of the Rose Pink Women’s Education and Mutual Aid Association in Diyarbakir, the largest city in Turkey’s mainly Kurdish southeast. In three classrooms, 70 12-year-old girls are hard at work studying for exams that will decide their secondary school future. Wearing headscarves that […]

Academics sign statement saying ‘rule of law suspended’

Professor Ayhan Aktar, Professor Ersin Kalaycıoğlu and Professor Yasemin İnceoğlu, as well as 147 other academics, signed a statement saying that the ruling Justice and Development Party (AK Party) government cannot ignore corruption allegations by making up claims of a “parallel state” — which has no meaning in political science or law — and placing all responsibility of unlawful acts on the Hizmet movement, which was inspired by Turkish Islamic scholar Fethullah Gülen.

Abrupt gov’t decision to revoke status of Kimse Yok Mu draws criticism

Turkey’s leading charity, Kimse Yok Mu (Is Anybody There), had its right to collect charitable donations abruptly rescinded on Tuesday, in what seems to be an arbitrary decision made during a Cabinet meeting, prompting harsh reactions from volunteers, lawmakers of the opposition parties and representatives of other civil society groups.

Turkish govt begins massive deportation of Nigerian students

The Turkish government is in a drive to deport all Nigerian students at universities linked to Fethullah Gulen’s Hizmet movement. Gulen is an Islamic cleric whom President Erdogan of Turkey considers as his strongest rival. After the botched July 15 coup, Erdogan launched a massive crackdown on the investments of Gulen’s followers. He blamed Gulen for the coup, but he has denied the allegation.

Turkey Coup Attempt Leaves America With Stark Choice

In the aftermath of Turkey’s attempted, and failed, coup, Washington is primarily concerned about the future of the U.S.-Turkish alliance and its central objective these days: the fight against Islamic State (ISIS). In particular, U.S. policymakers are concerned about the fate of U.S. access to the Turkish airbase at Incirlik, from which assets used in […]

Latest News

Gulen-linked school manager released on bail by Tbilisi court

EP’s Rebecca Harms Visited Turkish Educator Çabuk In Georgian Prison

8,480 Turkish nationals sought asylum in Germany in 2017

Georgia: MEP Rebecca Harms on Asylum for Cabuk

Gülen calls on int’l community to pressure Turkey over rights violations

Fethullah Gülen’s statement regarding the family that drowned in the Meric (Evros) River

Fethullah Gülen’s Statement of Condolences for Florida High School Shooting

Hundreds of young Turkish children jailed alongside their moms as part of a post-coup crackdown

3 dead, 5 missing in attempt to escape Turkey’s post-coup crackdown

In Case You Missed It

Fethullah Gülen’s Lawyers: Gülen Movement Has No Link With Zarrab Case In US

Former intel chief calls for use of ASALA, MOSSAD tactics to kill Gülen followers

The Turkish connection in India

False reports on Bank Asya breach laws

Hrant Topakiyan’s feelings about the Journalists and Writers Foundation

Courts order corrections to gov’t media stories on Hizmet

Gülen calls for respect for the sacred, denounces terrorism

Men accused of attempting to rape 6 teachers: We thought they were Gulenists

Principles of Gulen Inspired Schools – Boarding Schools

Copyright 2018 Hizmet News