Case of Calgary imam accused of plotting failed coup in Turkey will remain in limbo

A Calgary imam who has spent more than seven months in a Turkish prison has court date scheduled for today. A photo of a wedding picture of Rumeysa Hanci, right, and imam Davud Hanci, is seen in Calgary on in an August 2016 file photo.  (LARRY MACDOUGAL / THE CANADIAN PRESS)
A Calgary imam who has spent more than seven months in a Turkish prison has court date scheduled for today. A photo of a wedding picture of Rumeysa Hanci, right, and imam Davud Hanci, is seen in Calgary on in an August 2016 file photo. (LARRY MACDOUGAL / THE CANADIAN PRESS)


Date posted: March 8, 2017

LAUREN KRUGEL

Davud Hanci’s court appearance has been delayed. He was expected to appear today before a judge by video conference on allegations he helped orchestrate Turkey’s failed coup attempt last summer.

The case of a Calgary imam who has spent more than seven months in a Turkish prison will remain in limbo for another two months.

Davud Hanci was expected to appear today before a judge by video conference on allegations he helped orchestrate last summer’s attempted coup.

But his sister-in-law, Ruveyda Durmus, says the case has been delayed until May 3 because of a secret witness.

His wife says an earlier court date for Hanci, who has Canadian and Turkish citizenship, had been set for Jan. 31 but was postponed because of lack of evidence.

Rumeysa Hanci says worrying about her husband since his arrest last July has been like torture for her and their two young sons.

She says her husband is a peaceful man and the allegations against him are ridiculous.

“I feel so extremely overwhelmed. It’s really difficult to fight,” she said after ushering the couple’s two young sons out of the room so they wouldn’t be upset by her talking about their father.

“My mind is so full of everything.”

She said her husband is being kept in solitary confinement and has not been allowed visits or phone calls with family, but he has been able to see his lawyer face-to-face.

“She says he’s trying to be strong,” said Rumeysa.

Relatives have said the couple and their two sons, who are eight and nine, were in Turkey last July visiting the imam’s ailing father in Trabzon on the coast of the Black Sea.

Shortly after, he was moved to a prison nearly 1,000 kilometres away in the province of Kocaeli east of Istanbul.

“The accusations are so ridiculous,” said Rumeysa. “I want Canadians to know a good man is staying there without any evidence.”

Turkish news reports have accused Davud Hanci of having ties to Fethullah Gulen, a U.S.-based cleric whom the Turkish government accuses of masterminding the July 15 coup attempt.

Gulen, a former ally-turned-critic of Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, has denied any involvement.

Turkey has arrested tens of thousands in its investigation into the failed coup, and dismissed or suspended more than 100,000 people from government jobs.

Michael O’Shaughnessy of Global Affairs Canada called the case a priority, though he said privacy considerations prohibit him from discussing it in detail.

“We are actively engaged on this case, and doing everything we can to support the family,” he said. “Parliamentary Secretary Omar Alghabra has met with the individual’s family, and consular officials remain in regular contact.”

Rumeysa said the ordeal has been tough on their sons.

“They need him so much. So they keep asking questions like when he will be home,” she said.

“The boys are apart from their father and it’s hard to find answers to their questions anymore.”

“I want this torture to end as soon as possible,” she said. “I want him back home. I want him seeing my boys growing and taking care of them.”

Source: The Star , March 8, 2017


Related News

Wedding gifts will help build dorm and water wells in Tanzania

Ubeyd and Nurefşan Yeşil donated the gifts presented at their wedding to the Hizmet in Tanzania. Almost $40,000 value donation will be used in the construction of a college dormitory and water wells.

AK Party, Hizmet movement and politics

İHSAN YILMAZ  August 31, 2012 I have written repeatedly about the relationship between the Hizmet movement (aka Gulen movement) and politics here. Unfortunately, it still needs some more discussion. As is well known, Hizmet never associates itself with political parties. It is a volunteer movement that appeals to individuals from all sorts of social, cultural, […]

Government media runs riot in smear campaign against Hizmet

A news article in Daily Sabah, the new, English-language member of the government’s media lineup, claimed on Monday that the police are ratcheting up measures to patch holes in their security network in order to prevent leaks by Gülenists, a derogatory term used to describe the Hizmet movement.

Erdogan’s problem with his well-educated citizens

The government canceled the passports of all public servants purged with a decree and imposed travel restrictions on them and their spouses. Visiting scholars were ordered to return to Turkey. Academic freedom has been significantly restricted. In short, the entire educational system of Turkey has been crushed by the crackdown following the coup-attempt.

Turkey pays a price for purging counterterror professionals

In the wake of the abortive July 15 coup, he purged thousands of experienced counter-terror police and rotated others out of areas they know best. In effect, this means the Turkish security and police are operating blind. It can take years to gain the experience in any particular locality that those whom Erdogan fired had.

Smear campaign against Gülen fails after new details emerge on eavesdropping

The defamation campaign against the Gülen or Hizmet movement, which the Turkish president and his political Islamist Justice and Development Party (AK Party) government accuse of illegally wiretapping government officials, collapsed after it became clear that foreign security and intelligence agencies were involved in eavesdropping on senior Turkish officials.

Latest News

UK Parliament: No evidence that Gülen, movement behind coup attempt

Ex-CIA Director: Mike Flynn and Turkish Officials Discussed Removal of Gulen from U.S. without Going through Legal Process

Another suspicious death: Doctor dies of heart attack in prison

Turkish police detain 35 lawyers for ‘defending’ Gülen sympathizers

Monitoring group documents 53 suspicious deaths since coup attempt

65-year-old grandmother looking after twin babies as mother, father in jail for 5 months

Suspicious Deaths And Suicides On The Rise In Turkey With 54 People In Last 8 Months

US House Intel Chair Says ‘Hard To Believe’ Gulen Behind Turkey Coup

German spy agency chief says does not believe Gulen behind Turkey coup attempt

In Case You Missed It

Ruling AKP officials downplay tension with Gülen movement

Parliament Speaker Cicek visits Turkish School in Kiev

A Visit with Turkey’s Controversial Religious Movement

Gülen: purge of public officials seems ‘arbitrary’

Abant Platform on Africa

Terrorist investigation against Kimse Yok Mu draws strong reactions

Gülen: Smear campaign targets those promoting Turkish culture

Sajjanhar: Dialogue urges one to excel in one’s own faith

Deputy Minister of Culture Igor Șarov met the participants of the International Festival of Language and Culture

Copyright 2017 Hizmet News